What being an “Apraxia Dad” means to me!

As we reflect on Apraxia Awareness Month, we know now more than ever before that it takes a village to raise a child and it takes a community to raise awareness of childhood apraxia of speech. This year we saw significantly more families of children with apraxia get involved in raising awareness.

As we look forward to Father’s Day, we know that there continues to be a need for the whole family to support and encourage the child. As an organization, we want to honor fathers and father figures this month. We’re starting by recognizing some fathers who sit on our board and volunteer for our organization – they are sharing their story of what being an “apraxia dad” means to them!

 

Lou LaVecchia
Board of Directors Vice Chair

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Lou: I like to think that being a father to a child with apraxia is the same as a child without. In a lot of ways it is but there are noticeable differences as well. In the early years there were plenty of times that I could not understand my son even when asking for simple things like chocolate milk. I do believe that a child with apraxia needs the same things as any child but often needs them differently. The time and hard work my son has put in to finding his voice amaze me. The accomplishments he has made over the years impresses me.

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Lou: Patience is a vital quality for a father of a child with apraxia. Don’t ever give up on your child as they will amaze you. Don’t compare your child with apraxia with what others are doing, just concentrate on what they do well. Be proud of their accomplishments no matter how small they may seem.

 

Mark Conroe
Board of Directors

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Mark: It means going through a dark tunnel looking for light. It means seeing the light and feeling like you just experienced the one actual miracle in your life.  It means seeing your child struggling and still persevering and realizing how brave they are (and making me want to be braver).

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Mark: Get resources early!  Treat this as an opportunity to build a stronger team with your wife.  Realize it will put stress on your marriage.  There are times of fear (of the unknown); try to use this to grow as a person and as a family.

 


Erik Kuhta

Central New Jersey Walk Coordinator

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Erik: It means I have to be more thoughtful about the situations my children are in and focus more on setting up successful situations for them. It also means I am constantly worried about their future and how they will interact in our world as adults. It also means I am always looking for ways to make them feel like they fit in.

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Erik: Fight for the kids!  Be their voice where you need to and be patient with them. Remember they hear everything we say.

 

 

Lincoln Purdy
Board of Directors

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Lincoln: Being a father requires that you place the needs of your family above yourself.  Being the father of a child with CAS just amplifies this.  It means finding (or learning) empathy, patience, resiliency, energy, and flexibility.  It also allows you to witness up close, the incredible drive and determination of children as they struggle to find their voice.

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Lincoln: Of both your child and your partner/spouse:

Be supportive.  Be understanding.  Be patient.  Be helpful.  Be prepared to be amazed.

 

Join the conversation with other dads in our Just for Dads of Kids with Apraxia Facebook Group!

As we reflect on Apraxia Awareness Month, we know now more than ever before that it takes a village to raise a child and it takes a community to raise awareness of childhood apraxia of speech. This year we saw significantly more families of children with apraxia get involved in raising awareness.

As we look forward to Father’s Day, we know that there continues to be a need for the whole family to support and encourage the child. As an organization, we want to honor fathers and father figures this month. We’re starting by recognizing some fathers who sit on our board and volunteer for our organization – they are sharing their story of what being an “apraxia dad” means to them!

 

Lou LaVecchia
Board of Directors Vice Chair

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Lou: I like to think that being a father to a child with apraxia is the same as a child without. In a lot of ways it is but there are noticeable differences as well. In the early years there were plenty of times that I could not understand my son even when asking for simple things like chocolate milk. I do believe that a child with apraxia needs the same things as any child but often needs them differently. The time and hard work my son has put in to finding his voice amaze me. The accomplishments he has made over the years impresses me.

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Lou: Patience is a vital quality for a father of a child with apraxia. Don’t ever give up on your child as they will amaze you. Don’t compare your child with apraxia with what others are doing, just concentrate on what they do well. Be proud of their accomplishments no matter how small they may seem.

 

Mark Conroe
Board of Directors

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Mark: It means going through a dark tunnel looking for light. It means seeing the light and feeling like you just experienced the one actual miracle in your life.  It means seeing your child struggling and still persevering and realizing how brave they are (and making me want to be braver).

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Mark: Get resources early!  Treat this as an opportunity to build a stronger team with your wife.  Realize it will put stress on your marriage.  There are times of fear (of the unknown); try to use this to grow as a person and as a family.

 


Erik Kuhta

Central New Jersey Walk Coordinator

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Erik: It means I have to be more thoughtful about the situations my children are in and focus more on setting up successful situations for them. It also means I am constantly worried about their future and how they will interact in our world as adults. It also means I am always looking for ways to make them feel like they fit in.

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Erik: Fight for the kids!  Be their voice where you need to and be patient with them. Remember they hear everything we say.

 

 

Lincoln Purdy
Board of Directors

 

Apraxia Kids: What does being a father of a child with apraxia mean to you?

Lincoln: Being a father requires that you place the needs of your family above yourself.  Being the father of a child with CAS just amplifies this.  It means finding (or learning) empathy, patience, resiliency, energy, and flexibility.  It also allows you to witness up close, the incredible drive and determination of children as they struggle to find their voice.

Apraxia Kids: What would you say to other fathers or father figures?

Lincoln: Of both your child and your partner/spouse:

Be supportive.  Be understanding.  Be patient.  Be helpful.  Be prepared to be amazed.

 

Join the conversation with other dads in our Just for Dads of Kids with Apraxia Facebook Group!



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