Continue Black History Month Throughout the Year

February is Black History Month; a full month celebrating all of the incredible historical contributions that Black people and communities have made to our country and to our world. We hope you will join Apraxia Kids during this month (and beyond) and learn from, listen to, and support our Black communities. 

 

Yes, February is dedicated to Black History Month, but we should take these lessons far beyond just this one month. Apraxia Kids invites you to continue this learning and work throughout the rest of the year. Take some time to re-read the Black History Month blogs from this month, explore the resources and learning opportunities, and continue to grow with us. Read on for some more ways that you can continue your Black History Month learning throughout the year.

Continue Your Reading

There have been several lists of books, articles, movies, podcasts, and more that have been shared throughout our Black History Month blog series. You can revisit those blogs and lists any time you want to expand your learning or grow your book list! You can also check out the lists below for more learning opportunities.

 

Read BIPOC: A List of Books by Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color Writers by Art For Ourselves

 

And here are just a few additional favorites from members of our Diversity & Inclusion Task Force:

 

Non-American Fiction

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Buck: A Memoir by MK Asante

Half of A Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

HOMEGOING by Ya’a Gyasi

Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

 

Non-Fiction

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata

The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley and Malcom 

Becoming by  Michelle Obama 

Black Fortunes by Shomari Wills

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates 

Brainwashed by Tom Burrell

Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee by Dee Brown

Can We Talk about Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation (Race, Education, and Democracy) by Beverly Tatum

The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

The Half Has Never Been Told by Edward E. Baptist Frederick Douglass by Charles Chesnutt

How to Be An Antiracist by Ibram X Kendi

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome by Joy DeGruy

Prince of Darkness: The Untold Story of Jeremiah G. Hamilton, Wall Street’s First Black Millionaire by Shane White

Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi

Slavery by Another Name by Douglas Blackmon 

The Soul of America by Jon Meacham

Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo

Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Tatum 

Ways to Continue Black History Month Throughout the Year

There are many ways you can continue to support and amplify Black voices and the community as a whole throughout the year. Here are just a few ideas from our Diversity & Inclusion Task Force to help you find a place to start.

  • Support a Black business
  • Visit a Black History or Civil Rights Museum in your local area
  • Donate to a Black organization
  • Host a Black film marathon
  • Wear your hair out in its natural form to school, work or a social event
  • Become a member of a Black organization 
  • Trace your family history
  • Spend time with a Black elder in your community
  • Read a book by a Black author
  • Cook a soul food meal
  • Sign up to mentor a Black child in your community
  • Donate to an Historically Black College and University (HBCU)
  • Attend or host a Black culture event in your community
  • Learn about an unsung hero of Black history
  • Support a Black creative (artist, poet, local musician, etc.)
  • Study the African Diaspora
  • Explore Black Music
  • Call out racism and prejudice in your community
  • Sign up to receive news from a Black organization (i.e. NAACP)
  • Contribute an essay or blog to a Black media outlet 
  • Support the Black media, Black press, and the NNPA
  • Engage in healthy conversations about Black history on social media
  • Learn the lyrics to Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing
  • Read Dr. King’s I Have a Dream Speech
  • Decorate your home with Black Art
  • Read a biography of an influential Black figure
  • Read Black stories and authors
  • Watch Black history documentaries
  • Write a Black children’s book
  • Register to vote!

BIPOC Mental Health Resources

Everyone is experiencing their own mental health struggles in today’s world, the Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) community especially so. If you or someone you love needs support, please reach out for help. You are not alone. 

 

Family-Care, Community-Care, and Self-Care Tool Kit: Healing in the Face of Cultural Trauma by The Association of Black Psychologists 

Identity and Cultural Dimensions by National Alliance on Mental Illness 

Inclusive Therapists: A Safer, Simpler Way to Find Care

Social & Emotional Support Resources for Black, Indigenous, People of Color, and LGBTQIA+ Communities by Actors Fund

Talking About Race: Self-Care by Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture 

The BIPOC Project

Therapy For Black Girls

Therapy for Black Men

Therapy for Latinx

DISCLAIMER

Apraxia Kids does not endorse any one book, method, program, organization, service, or approach. Rather, we share information so families & professionals can make informed choices for children with CAS as they work to find their voices.

February is Black History Month; a full month celebrating all of the incredible historical contributions that Black people and communities have made to our country and to our world. We hope you will join Apraxia Kids during this month (and beyond) and learn from, listen to, and support our Black communities. 

 

Yes, February is dedicated to Black History Month, but we should take these lessons far beyond just this one month. Apraxia Kids invites you to continue this learning and work throughout the rest of the year. Take some time to re-read the Black History Month blogs from this month, explore the resources and learning opportunities, and continue to grow with us. Read on for some more ways that you can continue your Black History Month learning throughout the year.

Continue Your Reading

There have been several lists of books, articles, movies, podcasts, and more that have been shared throughout our Black History Month blog series. You can revisit those blogs and lists any time you want to expand your learning or grow your book list! You can also check out the lists below for more learning opportunities.

 

Read BIPOC: A List of Books by Black, Indigenous, and/or People of Color Writers by Art For Ourselves

 

And here are just a few additional favorites from members of our Diversity & Inclusion Task Force:

 

Non-American Fiction

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Buck: A Memoir by MK Asante

Half of A Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

HOMEGOING by Ya’a Gyasi

Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

 

Non-Fiction

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata

The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley and Malcom 

Becoming by  Michelle Obama 

Black Fortunes by Shomari Wills

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates 

Brainwashed by Tom Burrell

Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee by Dee Brown

Can We Talk about Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation (Race, Education, and Democracy) by Beverly Tatum

The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

The Half Has Never Been Told by Edward E. Baptist Frederick Douglass by Charles Chesnutt

How to Be An Antiracist by Ibram X Kendi

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome by Joy DeGruy

Prince of Darkness: The Untold Story of Jeremiah G. Hamilton, Wall Street’s First Black Millionaire by Shane White

Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi

Slavery by Another Name by Douglas Blackmon 

The Soul of America by Jon Meacham

Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo

Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together In The Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Tatum 

Ways to Continue Black History Month Throughout the Year

There are many ways you can continue to support and amplify Black voices and the community as a whole throughout the year. Here are just a few ideas from our Diversity & Inclusion Task Force to help you find a place to start.

  • Support a Black business
  • Visit a Black History or Civil Rights Museum in your local area
  • Donate to a Black organization
  • Host a Black film marathon
  • Wear your hair out in its natural form to school, work or a social event
  • Become a member of a Black organization 
  • Trace your family history
  • Spend time with a Black elder in your community
  • Read a book by a Black author
  • Cook a soul food meal
  • Sign up to mentor a Black child in your community
  • Donate to an Historically Black College and University (HBCU)
  • Attend or host a Black culture event in your community
  • Learn about an unsung hero of Black history
  • Support a Black creative (artist, poet, local musician, etc.)
  • Study the African Diaspora
  • Explore Black Music
  • Call out racism and prejudice in your community
  • Sign up to receive news from a Black organization (i.e. NAACP)
  • Contribute an essay or blog to a Black media outlet 
  • Support the Black media, Black press, and the NNPA
  • Engage in healthy conversations about Black history on social media
  • Learn the lyrics to Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing
  • Read Dr. King’s I Have a Dream Speech
  • Decorate your home with Black Art
  • Read a biography of an influential Black figure
  • Read Black stories and authors
  • Watch Black history documentaries
  • Write a Black children’s book
  • Register to vote!

BIPOC Mental Health Resources

Everyone is experiencing their own mental health struggles in today’s world, the Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) community especially so. If you or someone you love needs support, please reach out for help. You are not alone. 

 

Family-Care, Community-Care, and Self-Care Tool Kit: Healing in the Face of Cultural Trauma by The Association of Black Psychologists 

Identity and Cultural Dimensions by National Alliance on Mental Illness 

Inclusive Therapists: A Safer, Simpler Way to Find Care

Social & Emotional Support Resources for Black, Indigenous, People of Color, and LGBTQIA+ Communities by Actors Fund

Talking About Race: Self-Care by Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture 

The BIPOC Project

Therapy For Black Girls

Therapy for Black Men

Therapy for Latinx

DISCLAIMER

Apraxia Kids does not endorse any one book, method, program, organization, service, or approach. Rather, we share information so families & professionals can make informed choices for children with CAS as they work to find their voices.



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