An Apraxia Family Reunion

Last July was the first time I attended an Apraxia Kids conference. I was about nine months into my apraxia journey in which I was feeling very isolated, scared, and alone. My son Jack’s SLP, an Apraxia Kids boot camp graduate, encouraged me to attend the conference. At the time, money was a huge issue due to the fact we were paying for private therapy and attorney fees.

Thankfully through her support and Apraxia Kids, I was selected for a scholarship that allowed me to attend the conference. This was the first time I traveled to an unknown destination by myself. I wasn’t nervous or scared because within those nine months, I realized I have traveled many unknowns throughout this apraxia journey.

After arriving and getting settled at the hotel, I made my way down to the opening reception. As an apraxia Mom and doctoral student, I have read and researched many of the most prominent researchers in the field. When I walked into the room, there were many people who I didn’t know, but I had this feeling come over me that they were not strangers at all. In fact, within five minutes of speaking with some of the attendees, I felt as if I was home.

For the first time in nine months, I finally felt as if I belonged somewhere with people who understood me and embraced me. I felt as if I was being embraced into a family.

Fast forward a year to my second conference last week, I could not wait to be reunited with my apraxia family. I was counting down the days, hours, and minutes to the conference. After a grueling year of PPT meetings, numerous changes in Jack’s speech program, and unsupportive family, I needed my apraxia family more than ever.

Just as I expected, as soon as I was reunited with them, it gave me the strength I needed to return home to continue fighting for Jack. The lessons learned, relationships strengthened, and friendships gained will carry me another year into my journey.

Until I am reunited with my apraxia family again, I will lean on them in times of stress and upset because the most important thing I learned is that I am not alone.

 

Patty Miller currently serves as the Volunteer Outreach Coordinator in Connecticut. You can join the local Connecticut community on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/apraxiakidsconnecticut/ or contact Patty directly at pattym@apraxia-kids.org

Last July was the first time I attended an Apraxia Kids conference. I was about nine months into my apraxia journey in which I was feeling very isolated, scared, and alone. My son Jack’s SLP, an Apraxia Kids boot camp graduate, encouraged me to attend the conference. At the time, money was a huge issue due to the fact we were paying for private therapy and attorney fees.

Thankfully through her support and Apraxia Kids, I was selected for a scholarship that allowed me to attend the conference. This was the first time I traveled to an unknown destination by myself. I wasn’t nervous or scared because within those nine months, I realized I have traveled many unknowns throughout this apraxia journey.

After arriving and getting settled at the hotel, I made my way down to the opening reception. As an apraxia Mom and doctoral student, I have read and researched many of the most prominent researchers in the field. When I walked into the room, there were many people who I didn’t know, but I had this feeling come over me that they were not strangers at all. In fact, within five minutes of speaking with some of the attendees, I felt as if I was home.

For the first time in nine months, I finally felt as if I belonged somewhere with people who understood me and embraced me. I felt as if I was being embraced into a family.

Fast forward a year to my second conference last week, I could not wait to be reunited with my apraxia family. I was counting down the days, hours, and minutes to the conference. After a grueling year of PPT meetings, numerous changes in Jack’s speech program, and unsupportive family, I needed my apraxia family more than ever.

Just as I expected, as soon as I was reunited with them, it gave me the strength I needed to return home to continue fighting for Jack. The lessons learned, relationships strengthened, and friendships gained will carry me another year into my journey.

Until I am reunited with my apraxia family again, I will lean on them in times of stress and upset because the most important thing I learned is that I am not alone.

 

Patty Miller currently serves as the Volunteer Outreach Coordinator in Connecticut. You can join the local Connecticut community on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/apraxiakidsconnecticut/ or contact Patty directly at pattym@apraxia-kids.org



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