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Find articles about education, learning and school-related needs of children with CAS. What to include in school programs...

  • Speech and Language Goals and Planning an IEP for Children with Apraxia

    Part 2

    By
    Lori Hickman, M.S., CCC-SLP

    The goal of intervention for a child with apraxia is to enable the child to gain volitional control of his/her articulators in order to produce age-appropriate, co-articulated, intelligible speech (co-articulation refers to the way we talk when we connect our words together in a speech-melody, rather than pronouncing each word individually). To that end, I […]

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  • A Comparison of the Use of Low-Tech and High-Tech Communication Systems for Children with CAS

    By
    Korey L. Stading M.S., CCC-SLP Munroe-Meyer Institute, RiteCare Clinic University of Nebraska Medical Center and Amy S. Nordness Ph.D, CCC-SLP Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital

    BACKGROUND Children diagnosed with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) struggle to communicate basic needs to even those closest to them. In addition to severely unintelligible speech, CAS is often accompanied by language and literacy deficits, academic difficulties, deficits in phonological processing and literacy, and social disadvantages (ASHA, 2007; Lewis, Freebairn, Hansen, Stein, Shriberg, Iyengar, et […]

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  • Special Considerations for Psychological/Educational Evaluations of Children with No Speech or Unintelligible Speech

    By
    Ellen B. Braaten, Ph.D., and Gretchen Felopulos, Ph.D.

    The first thing to keep in mind when testing children with significant speech delays is that most standardized tests of intelligence will either be inappropriate or of questionable validity. Because language is such an important component of most tests of intelligence, it is nearly impossible to validly give those tests (such as the WISC-IV or […]

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  • Literacy and Children with Apraxia of Speech

    By
    Sharon Gretz, M.Ed.

    Many parents wonder if their young child with apraxia of speech (verbal dyspraxia) will go on to experience difficulties in their education . While there is no certainty that literacy problems will or will not develop, there is research that has shown that children with spoken language problems are at higher risk for literacy related […]

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  • The Effects of Motor Planning Deficits on School Function

    By
    Ann Marie Ferreti, OTR/L, CHT

    Many individuals close to childhood apraxia of speech hear the words “motor planning” and think of speech. However, motor planning affects everything that requires movement; a child’s function at home, at school and in every extra-curricular or leisure activity that they are involved in. Motor planning is the ability to plan and carry out motor […]

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  • Understanding Tests and Measurements for the Parent and Advocate

    Part 2

    By
    Peter Wright and Pam Darr Wright

    (back to Part 1) Understanding the Bell Curve On all bell curves, the bottom or horizontal line is called the X axis. In our sample of fifth graders, the X axis represents “number of push-ups.” And, on all bell curves, the up- and- down vertical line is called the Y axis. In our sample, the […]

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  • Understanding Tests and Measurements for the Parent and Advocate

    Part 1

    By
    Peter Wright and Pamela Darr Wright

    (article reprinted with permission of the author) “If something exists, it exists in some amount. If it exists in some amount, then it is capable of being measured.” Rene Descartes, Principles of Philosophy, 1644. Introduction Most parents of special needs children know that they must understand the law and their rights. Few parents know that […]

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  • Writing Letters and Their Role in Advocating for Your Child

    By
    Judy Bonnell

    (Reprinted with permission from the author) What is a Letter of Understanding? When people communicate misunderstandings can occur. Not everyone hears the same information in the same way. What we hear is often colored by our personal experiences, cultural influences, and our expectations. Administrators, special ed personnel, teachers, and parents can misunderstand what is being […]

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  • What is The Association Method?

    The Association Method is a multisensory, phonics-based method which is highly intensive, incremental and systematic in its design, enabling seriously communication impaired children to acquire reading, writing, and oral language skills simultaneously. It was developed by Mildred McGinnis at the Central Institute for the Deaf and described in her book, “Aphasic Children” published in 1963. […]

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  • What is Bullying? Are There Unique Risks for Children with Disabilities?

    By
    Kelly Champion, Ph.D.

    Bullying is a serious problem for some students but not all acts of aggression that are concerning are understood to be bullying. To qualify as a bully, a child must repeatedly use aggression intentionally to hurt someone and to obtain privileges or to demonstrate power over his or her peers without provocation. Bullying behavior is […]

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