National Conference Schedule and Topics

Welcome! Here you will find the schedule for the 2019 Apraxia Kids National Conference!

We at Apraxia Kids are excited about this year’s line-up, which includes new opportunities such as designated school therapist pre-conference sessions, different lengths of sessions to allow some topics to be covered in more depth, and a mix of individual speakers and co-presentations.

You will see that there are no repeated sessions this year due to the high quality and number of talk proposals received.  Instead there are some of the most frequently requested topics that are covered twice or more by different speakers such as literacy issues, updates on testing and assessment, vowel assessment and treatment, and genetics.

Also, please note that we have many sessions for more experienced parents and SLPs as well as those newer to CAS or part way through the journey. Please see our sample schedules if you need assistance in knowing what sessions will work for you!

Interested in learning more? Be sure to check out our pre-conference sessions that are sure to be amazing and well worth the additional cost!

 

At-A-Glance Conference Agenda

**Note**  All sessions are not the same length at this year’s conference.  Please continue to scroll down to see the complete National Conference Session Guide.

 

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Pre-Conference Registration     7:00 am – 3:30 pm

School Based Training (SLPs Only)

  • Breakfast 7:30 am – 8:00 am
    SBT01 – Working with Preschoolers 8:00 am – 10:00 am
    SBT02 – Working with Elementary-Aged Students 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
    Lunch Break 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm
    SBT03 – Working with Middle/High School Students  1:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Pre-Conference Seminars (no lunch provided prior to the seminars)

Session 100, 200 & 300     1:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Opening Reception     4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Keynote Address     5:45 pm – 7:00 pm

 

Friday July 12, 2019

Registration and Breakfast     6:45 am – 8:00 am

Welcome Session     8:00 am – 8:30 am

Break     8:30 am – 9:00 am

Series 100     9:00 am – 11:30 am

Lunch 11:45 am – 12:45 pm

  • Lunch & Learns (Prior registration required; Space is limited) 11:45 am – 12:45 pm
    • Time for Dads
    • Canadian Resources
    • PBS Resources to Bridge Speech

Series 200     1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Break     2:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Series 300     3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Gateway Clipper (Ticketed event; Registration required; Space is limited)     6:15 pm – 9:30 pm

 

Saturday July 13, 2019

Registration & Breakfast     6:45 am – 8:00 am

Series 400     8:00 am – 10:00 am

Break     10:00 am – 10:30 am

Series 500     10:30 am – 11:30 am

Lunch Break     11:45 am – 12:45 pm

  • Speaker Raffle Luncheon (1 ticket included in registration fee) 11:45 am – 12:45 pm

Series 600     1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Break     2:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Series 701     3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Session Guide

Thursday, July 11, 2019

School-Based Training

Note:  These sessions are only open to professionals.  They are not included in the standard registration fee. Tickets to attend these sessions can be purchased on the registration page.

 

Session SBT01: Working with Preschoolers

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:  ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Suzanne DeMarco, MS, CCC-SLP, Dave Hammer, MA, CCC-SLP

This session, co-presented by a school-based SLP from the Boston area and a CAS preschool specialist from the Pittsburgh area, will look at critical elements in working with preschool-aged children.  These include techniques for preschoolers who don’t imitate, moving from syllables through single word productions to 2-word utterances using the Principles of Motor Learning, how to choose targets, and building prosody into therapy.  This session will include many practical, hands-on suggestions.  A wide range of highly motivating therapy ideas will be provided with video examples used extensively to facilitate learning.

 

Session SBT02: Working with Elementary-Aged Students

Time: 10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Level:  ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Deborah Comfort, MA, CCC-SLP, Megan Leece, MA, CCC-SLP

Elementary students with CAS present a variety of challenges for the school-based SLP. In addition to the speech characteristics of CAS, children can also struggle with oral and written language skills. These difficulties may manifest as difficulties in the areas of phonological awareness and language skills. In addition, deficits in expressive language impact a student’s ability to participate in back-and-forth conversations and develop and maintain positive relationships with peers and adults.  In this session, common co-morbidities of CAS will be reviewed, along with suggested treatment strategies. In considering the educational environment, attendees will be given the opportunity to discuss important factors in developing legally-defensible IEPs using a recent Supreme Court decision. From that case, the lessons learned to the development of IEPs for children, with CAS will be applied, including ideas for writing collaborative goals, strategies for assessing educational and functional impact, and approaches for tracking session data and progress monitoring. Caseload management strategies will also be discussed.

 

Session SBT03: Working with Middle/High School Students

Time: 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Level:  ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Kay Giesecke, MS, CCC-SLP, Mikey Akers, Natalie Yoder

This session will look at critical elements in working with middle school and high school students.  These include the most common residual speech/language issues as well as non-speech/language challenges that tend to co-occur with CAS.  Strategies to facilitate ongoing progress in therapy will be discussed and will include motivating ways to keep this age group engaged.  As part of this session, young adults from two different countries will provide their perspectives on the middle/high school challenges that they encountered on their CAS journeys.

Pre-Conference Sessions

Note: These sessions are not included in the standard registration fee. Tickets to attend these sessions can be purchased on the registration page.

 

Session 100: Ask the Parents: Journeys Shared, Navigation Help Provided

Time: 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Level:  Beginning Learning Level for Parents   Experienced Learning Level for Parents

Presenters: Michelle Gianetti, Jaime LaVecchia, Michelle Leigh, Patty Miller, Kelly Pichitino, Laura Smith

This unique session, run by parents and facilitated by SLPs, will be divided into two sections – observation of a parent focus group experience and participation in a Q & A time.  Many parents have now been on the CAS journey for some time and want to share their experiences.  The parent/caregiver focus group, led by a CAS researcher and observed by audience members, will be the initial step for a research study that intends to gain knowledge about how children with CAS experience everyday aspects of life. This dynamic discussion between parents will explore their greatest concerns regarding their children’s social and academic interactions, how having CAS has shaped their children’s experiences, and how SLPs can assist in their children achieving individualized goals.  The Q&A portion will include segments by a parent panel on Coping through the Journey and Traversing Academic Challenges.  This session will be moderated by Nancy Tarshis.  Please NOTE: For research purposes, portions of this session will be recorded. 

 

Session 200: Two Approaches to Getting Started with Minimally Verbal Toddlers

Time: 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Level:  Experienced Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Cari Ebert, MS, CCC-SLP, Leah Melamed, MS, CCC-SLP

Designing an effective speech therapy program for minimally verbal toddlers can be a challenge, especially when receptive language skills are strong, but speech skills are not progressing. Traditional play-based speech therapy methods are often ineffective when children present with motor planning struggles. This presentation will provide a blueprint of strategies and goals for getting started in speech therapy with these minimally verbal young children. Two speech-language pathologists who specialize in the birth to three population will outline their therapy approaches for working with toddlers who have suspected childhood apraxia of speech (sCAS).

 

Session 300: Unravelling the Neural and Genetic Architecture of CAS and Findings from the Latest Brain Imaging Research

Time: 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Level:  ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Angela T. Morgan, B. Psych (Hon), PhD, Michael Hildebrand, PhD, Frederique J. Liegeois, PhD

This pre-conference session will be co-presented by a speech-language pathologist, a molecular geneticist, and a developmental cognitive neuroscientist.  Little is understood about the etiology of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), although there is increasing evidence that at least some children may have a genetic cause for their speech presentation. Since the discovery of FOXP2, the first gene identified associated with CAS, only a handful of other genes have been definitively associated with the condition.  In this session, the presenters will discuss genome-wide sequencing of a further cohort of unrelated children diagnosed with CAS. To date, genes associated with CAS seem to play a role in brain development. Yet there have been few brain imaging studies of CAS, and people with CAS have no brain abnormalities. Here we will contrast brain MRI findings from (i) individuals with CAS due to FOXP2 variant (ii) a large family with inherited CAS of unknown genetic cause. From a brain perspective, we show that there can be several explanations of CAS. The most recent brain imaging research findings will be described.

Keynote Address

Thursday, July 11, 2019
5:45 PM – 7:00 PM

Turning CAS Research into CAS Practice – Thoughts for Parents and Professionals from Left Field

Presented By: Tricia McCabe, BAppSc(Sp) PhD CPSP

The 2019 Keynote Address will explore how we can use the emerging science of behavioural economics to change how we as SLPs and parents/caregivers support children with apraxia. We will look at how psychological shortcuts get in the way of change – whether it be changing therapists, changing therapy techniques, and/or changing strategies to facilitate repetitive practice in therapy and at home. Ideas such as defaults, loss aversion, cognitive consistency and the sunk cost fallacy will be explored in a user-friendly manner with real-life examples.  Tricia will use examples from her practice and her research to explore these ideas.

Friday, July 12, 2019

Series 100

Welcome to the 2019 Apraxia Kids National Conference

Time: 8:00 am – 8:30 am

Presenters: Apraxia Kids Staff and Board

 

Session 101Apraxia 101 and Making the Most of Your Conference Experience

Time: 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Level:  Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Breanna Waldrup, MS, CCC-SLP, Laura Moorer, MA, CCC-SLP, Denise Santos Ford, MS, CCC-SLP, Stacy Hyde, MSLP, CCC-SLP

Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a complex speech disorder that brings with the diagnosis, brand new terminology and concepts for parents and caregivers to understand. Attending conference sessions is one proactive way that parents/caregivers can learn about, understand and secure needed services in order for their children with apraxia to succeed. This session, taught by a panel of apraxia specialists, is designed to introduce/review with parents and caregivers the terms, acronyms and concepts associated with CAS that they will likely hear in the conference sessions. This will help participants to feel confident in making the very most of this unique opportunity. The session will also provide information on speech therapist selection decision-making tips, important therapy components to consider, and home practice suggestions.

 

Session 102: Intervention for CAS: Making Informed Choices

Time: 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Level: Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Pooja Aggarwal, MS CCC-SLP, Ruth Stoeckel, PhD, CCC-SLP

Your child has a diagnosis of CAS, and is now enrolled in therapy. You are getting information and advice from a variety of sources, some of which is contradictory. “You should do aquatherapy,” “My friend told me about a special kind of music therapy that will help,” “You should make sure your child is with an SLP who knows (Name) therapy.” How do you know what to take seriously? There is a growing body of evidence that examines how different aspects of therapy can influence progress. In this session, we will discuss how to find credible resources, and how information from those resources can be used to guide choices about intervention practices. Evidence based resources will help both parents and professionals advocate for best practices for each child. Group discussion, case examples, and a special segment highlighting Frequently Asked Questions will be used to facilitate learning.

 

Session 103: Dynamic Dialogue Amongst Super-Sleuths

Time: 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Level:  ♦ Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Margaret (Dee) Fish, MS, CCC-SLP, Lisa Leonard, MA, CCC-SLP

Get ready for an interactive dialogue among SLPs who want to refine skills in evaluating children with suspected CAS and use assessment data to develop effective treatment plans. In this session, case studies of children whose speech is highly unintelligible will be presented. Participants will work through a series of questions and determine each next step in the motor speech evaluation process, from recognizing red flags that may lead you to consider CAS as a possible diagnosis through making an accurate differential diagnosis. Throughout this course, participants will practice transcription, analyze video samples, and participate in interactive discussions focused on identifying characteristics of CAS and making clinical decisions regarding treatment plan development.

 

Session 104: We Can Expand on That!

Time: 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Level:  Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Sarah Carmody, MS, CCC-SLP, Isabelle Demosthenes, M.P.O, Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP,

Join us for a fun and interactive panel discussion inspired by our experiences at the 2018 Apraxia Kids Intensive Training Institute (aka “Boot Camp”). You-the-audience give us the building blocks. Tell us your child’s favorite game, toy, book, or character. Name an item in your therapy room, classroom, or home. Describe that place or time when it’s just impossible to practice speech or share the activity that led to your most magical practice session. Bring us your most pressing, most challenging or most confusing case, perhaps co-existing diagnoses … let’s crack that open. How would a PROMPT instructor/therapist approach your question? How would we address this concern if multiple languages were at play? What targets would we pick to start DTTC? What might we do in the medical – educational, private clinic, or home practice setting? Our panelists are just like you-Apraxia Kids community members, parents who’ve walked the journey, professionals with an eye toward evidenced-based, meaningful therapy. Together we’ll expand our toolboxes and our mindset for tackling severe communication challenges!

 

Session 105: What is AAC? When and Why do We Use It?

Time: 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Level:  Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Marleah Herman-Umpleby, MS, CCC-SLP, Melissa Taberski, MS, CCC-SLP

Use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) as a part of a comprehensive apraxia intervention that addresses both compensatory strategies and skill development is often a new experience for both parents and SLPs.  Questions of when and why to use it, as well as how best to implement it in the home, school, and community setting, are often at the forefront of AAC consideration.  It can be overwhelming to determine which option is the best choice, as well as how to get all members of a team on the same page in facilitating optimal usage. This session will address high tech and light tech AAC.  Videos and hands-on experience will be provided to enhance the learning. A detailed case study will be highlighted to help answer questions that may arise when determining how AAC can play a role in successful therapy.  Whether you are a parent or a professional, you will walk away with a better understanding of AAC usage.

 

Session 106: Two-Four-Six-Eight…..How Do Literacy, Dyslexia and CAS Relate?

Time: 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Level:  Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Mary Cousino, MA, CCC-SLP, Gina Vasiloff, MS, CCC-SLP, Kenda Hammer, MEd

There is a well-established and known correlation seen in children with severe speech sound disorders and literacy acquisition. Our presentation will examine this correlation, review current literature on the topic and explore possible cohesive motor speech therapy and literacy intervention plans of care that span the CAS treatment journey. In addition, we will review the results of a survey administered to speech-language pathologists at a large pediatric hospital that explored clinician-based knowledge of this correlation and provide suggestions for clinician education that ensures best care for children with CAS and literacy needs.  An extensive Q&A moderated by a literacy specialist will follow.

 

Session 107: Attention and Executive Functioning Deficits

Time: 9:00 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Paul Beljan, PsyD, ABPdN, ABN, Lynn Carahaly, MA, CCC-SLP

This session focuses on the brain basis of attention and executive functioning (EF) and impact on language and learning. It is not uncommon for children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) to have comorbid disorders such as attention and executive function deficit (EFD). This interactive lecture provides an understanding of all of the components involved in an intact attention and EF system and its relationship with language and learning. Participants will be equipped with the ability to generate appropriate interventions for students who also have ADHD and EFD. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is as widely misdiagnosed as it is misunderstood and mistreated.  This interactive lecture will provide an understanding of all of the components involved in an intact attention and executive function system, enabling caretakers and SLPs to not only determine what is willful behavior and what is not, but to also be able to generate appropriate interventions and expectations of children with ADHD/EFD.

Lunch and Learn

**Please note: Limited seating is available for Lunch & Learn sessions.**

Canadian Resources

Calling ALL CANADIANS.

This Lunch and Learn will connect you with other Canadians involved in the apraxia community including researchers, speakers, families, and SLPs recognized by Apraxia Kids for advanced training and expertise in childhood apraxia of speech! Come and learn about the development of a national apraxia organization for Canada and meet the team behind it! You’ll also learn about other Canadian events and programs coming up in the next year. Don’t miss out on this opportunity!

 

A Time for Dads

Dads approach the journey with CAS from a perspective that is helpful to share with other dads.  The Dads Lunch and Learn provides an opportunity to talk openly about the struggle times, the good times and all that is in between in raising a child with CAS.  This session is led by a father of a child with CAS and is for dads only.

 

PBS Resources to Bridge Speech

In this unique session from our local Pittsburgh WQED, learn techniques drawn from Sesame Street, Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, and other PBS programs to assist children in handling disappointment, anger, and conflict. Learn how to use My Street, and WQED’s PBS Learning Media to share video assets, clips, and songs with your children. PBS materials for teachers, parents and students will be provided

Series 200

Session 201: Helping Children with CAS Become Communication Risk Takers

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Cari Ebert, MS, CCC-SLP

Overcoming obstacles and learning new skills is the overall goal for young children with apraxia. Unfortunately, most children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) are not keen on taking communication risks because they anticipate failure. Through our interactions as parents and therapists we can instill the perseverance, grit, and tenacity these children will need to deal with the trials and tribulations related to becoming functionally verbal. It is critical for us to always remember that communication is inherently social; therefore, the relationships we develop with children who have CAS are just as important as the motor-speech skills that we seek to establish.

 

Session 202: Figuring it Out: Tests and Tasks for Diagnosis of CAS

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:  Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Ruth Stoeckel, PhD, CCC-SLP

At what age can a child be evaluated for CAS? What test can be used to assure a correct diagnosis? These and other questions come up regularly in internet discussions about children with a suspected, or confirmed, diagnosis of CAS. Confident diagnosis can be challenging for a number of reasons. A child’s age, developmental ability, and the presence of co-occurring communication disorders need to be considered. However, research continues to seek answers for how to identify motor planning/programming impairment and differentiate it from other communication impairments. As a result, clinicians have an increasing variety of tools to call upon when assessing children for the question of CAS. In this session, we will discuss pros and cons of various test instruments (including the newly published DEMSS) and assessment tasks that SLPs may use with children of different ages to identify characteristics of motor planning/programming impairment and rule in/rule out CAS as a diagnosis. Video examples will be used to enhance the learning.

 

Session 203: ReST – Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment, An Introduction

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:  ♦ Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Tricia McCabe, BAppSc(Sp) PhD CPSP

ReST is a treatment for older or less severe children and adolescents which aims to teach the child with CAS how to manage both their sound accuracy and their prosody at the same time. ReST has research evidence supporting its use in children and adolescents aged 4-14 and has clinically been used in later adolescents and with adults who have acquired apraxia of speech. In the research, ReST worked when provided 2-4 times per week face-to-face with the clinician and also by telehealth. This presentation will go through the basic information about the treatment and address frequently asked questions.

 

Session 204: Vowels in CAS: From Assessment to Intervention

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:  Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Brooke Rea, MCISc, SLP (C)

Vowel difficulties are a hallmark feature of CAS and their assessment and treatment can be elusive!  Vowel development, assessment or treatment are not addressed in many SLP training programs.  Join this session to explore the current research on the typical development of vowel production, ideas for assessing vowels in children with CAS, and practical clinical therapy activities for treatment.  This session will include video examples of assessment and treatment of vowels in preschool and school-aged children with CAS.

 

Session 205: Ultrasound Visual Biofeedback: A Hands-On Experience

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Jonathan Preston, PhD, CCC-SLP Megan Leece, MA, CCC-SLP, Caitlin Vose, PhD, CCC-SLP

Research has shown that children with CAS can improve speech sound production skills during treatment programs that include real-time visual feedback technologies such as ultrasound. Visual feedback is intended to enhance feedback to improve a clinician’s cueing, as well as enhance a child’s feedback and recognition of articulatory errors. We will provide an overview of visual feedback, including the strengths and the limitations of the approach. We will discuss candidacy (i.e., older children approximately ages 7 years and above with good visual and cognitive skills). We will summarize the literature on ultrasound visual feedback, currently consisting of single case experimental designs with replication; that is, targeted speech movement patterns have been shown to improve in about 75% of cases of children with persisting speech errors (including derhotacized /r/, lateralized sibilants, fronted velars, or backed alveolars).

 

Session 206: Books in Speech Therapy: The Right Fit for Every Chapter of the Journey

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   ♦ Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Laura Smith, MA, CCC-SLP & Kimberly Peterman, MA, CCC-SLP

In therapy for children with CAS, there are often many goal areas to practice and the need for multiple repetitions can make it feel overwhelming. Frequently, children with CAS are in speech therapy for a long time, which can easily become tedious and dull, including home practice. The solution to these issues is simple – take a look, it’s in a book! In this session, the presenters will discuss how SLPs, and parents can use a children’s book to target any goal area, use principles of motor learning, and while doing so in an age-appropriate way. Special focus will also be placed on using book reading for relationship building, creating authentic communication situations, and supporting literacy skill development.  Discussion will also include how this changes for students of various ages, as well as how book reading differs during a therapy session versus at home with caregivers. Participants will leave the presentation with renewed confidence that they already have all that they need to help children with CAS make progress on their goals. That is, if they are willing to read between the lines.

 

Session 207: A Father’s Journey

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Matthew Stevens, John Bennett

There are good days.  There are not-so-good days.  There are great days.  The father’s perspective of a family learning about childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is one of emotion, education, and advocacy.  First, sharing a personal story of why this presentation is possible is important to lay the foundation. Next, the spectrum of emotions that are felt from the pre-stages of diagnosis to a robust advocacy awareness program will be outlined. Celebrating what may seem like small moments continue to encourage your child to push through their delays.  Educating families, friends, and those unaware of CAS is vital to ensuring the diagnosis receives the respect and treatment these children deserve. Although it is easy to say that you need to remain strong, we will discuss what that looks like and how to drive forward.  It is ok to not be ok; however, staying in that mind-set is detrimental to future successes.  This is not a presentation centered on insurance or financial commitments, but rather two fathers passionate about bringing CAS to the forefront in hopes of increasing awareness.  And it starts with a simple idea; a car decal.

Series 300

Session 301: Advocating for Your Child’s IEP and Legal Protection

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Lou LaVecchia, David Bindrup, Esq., CPA, LL.M

As parents of children who have CAS, we believe advocating for your children is the most important part of helping children in need.  Navigating the IEP process can often be confusing and difficult to understand for parents of children with disabilities.  Parents should not rely solely on their school districts to determine what services will be offered and how they will be provided.  Parents play a crucial role in the process.  We will provide guidance and tips to help you along the way.  We will also provide strategies to work through situations when you may not agree with the school district’s assessment, services offered, or compliance to an existing IEP. Learn how to interview attorneys and what questions are necessary to find the right attorney with the sufficient experience, degrees, and success working with your particular school district to help your children gain an appropriate education.  You will also learn how to properly protect your children so if you become disabled, incapacitated, or pass away, your children’s advocate is properly designated and your estate doesn’t prevent your children from receiving free government assistance.

 

Session 302: When CAS and Sensory Processing Disorder Co-Occur

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Level:  Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Cari Ebert, MS, CCC-SLP

Young children with CAS often have other challenges that make learning to talk even more of a struggle. A child who presents with sensory differences alongside the motor-speech disorder may present with unexpected behaviors that interfere with learning and development. Understanding that sensory input drives motor and behavioral output provides the foundation for this course. The way young children take in and respond to sensory information can have a significant impact on their learning, development, and behavior. This course will outline how to create sensory-rich learning environments at home and in therapy to support motor-speech development.

 

Session 303:Anxiety – Perspectives from a Young Adult and a Mental Health Therapist

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Sharon Campbell, LPC, Natalie Yoder

Many young adults who have grown up with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) talk about experiencing anxiety. There have been studies done by researchers involving stuttering and anxiety, but none specifically relating to CAS.  In this presentation, a young adult will talk about how anxiety and apraxia influenced her life.  She will discuss her long-term denial about having anxiety and how she eventually found what helped to relieve this.  Lastly, she will talk about potential warning signs and coping strategies. A child psychologist will follow with her perspectives on anxiety and relate these to the young adult’s journey.

 

Session 304: Getting Unstuck!

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Shelley L. Velleman, PhD., CCC-SLP

Your client definitely has childhood apraxia of speech (CAS).  You’re confident about the goals you’ve selected.  You’ve chosen a tried-and-true evidence-based method that’s worked for you before but….no progress this time.  You’re stuck!  Now what?  Do you abandon the method?.. the goals?.. the client? .. the field? A systematic problem-solving strategy for analyzing the factors that may be barriers to progress will be presented.  These include the type of learning that is being measured (e.g., automaticity vs. self-monitoring; performance vs. generalization) as well as nature of the input (e.g., vocal vs. gestural), and the nature of the feedback provided (e.g., immediate vs. delayed).  Review of case studies will provide practical application of the concepts discussed so that you feel ready to use them with your next client with CAS.

 

Session 305:  Meeting the Challenge: Boot Campers Rewrite the ASHA Position Statement

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Sarah Carmody, MS, CCC-SLP Isabelle Demosthenes, MPO, Joy Pennington, MA, CCC-SLP, Karen Ruehle-Kumar, MA, CCC-SLP, Jennifer Sakowicz, MS, CCC-SLP, Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, Breanna Waldrup, MS, CCC-SLP

Less than one year ago on a university campus not very far away … A group of dedicated, enthusiastic SLPs converged for five days. Guided by supportive, brilliant mentoring clinicians, we eagerly set our collective minds to a challenge undertaken by no Boot Camper ever before: Revising and Expanding the ASHA Position Statement on CAS (affectionately: The REPS Project). Eleven years prior, ASHA (2007) published a foundational policy document defining CAS and delineating the role of the SLP in its identification and appropriate treatment. Additionally, the document emphasized the urgent need for increased research in motor speech evaluation and treatment. After pouring over hundreds of pages of research, the 2018 Boot Campers were ready to critically analyze and update ASHA’s position statement on CAS. This talk will include the highlights of our learning and rewriting exercise. We will clarify the evidence and practical content we felt most crucial to convey to real-world SLPs – those “in the trenches” who are looking to such documents for guidance.

 

Session 306:  A Pittsburgh Success Story: Jump Starting Your Child’s Education

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Eileen McCartney Cirelli, CCC/L-SLP, Heidy Frycke, CCC/L-SLP, Angela Markwood, CCC-SLP, Jessica Zetkulic, CCC-SLP, Nicole Zielmanski, CCC-SLP

We invite you to participate in a panel discussion exploring the decades-long success of the “Primary Expressions” Language Classroom/s of the Allegheny Intermediate Unit in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  This K-1 program provides students with moderate to severe speech/language needs (including, but not limited to, CAS) with a ‘jump start’ to the rest of their academic career.  This model has successfully paired a host district with an Intermediate Unit classroom to provide intensive, curriculum-based support. Our panel is ready to examine both the successes and challenges of operating an independent classroom in the days of limited funding, share tips for expanding the model into district-based classrooms, and brainstorm with the students, parents, and professionals in the audience to help us expand and grow the Primary Expressions Classroom/s into the future.

 

Session 307: PROMPT: Parents and Clinicians in Partnership

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Amy Clark, MS, CCC-SLP, Guy Lisella

Making informed choices regarding the assessment and treatment a child receives is a big decision and can be difficult.  As an SLP, determining the assessment and treatment you consistently implement in your clinical practice can be equally as challenging.  Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT) is a philosophy, approach, system and technique that helps clients with CAS reach their full potential.  The Conceptual Framework is an integral part of PROMPT that allows parents and clinicians to determine individualized strengths and weaknesses holistically.  This presentation will describe and demonstrate PROMPT assessment and treatment from a clinical and non-clinical perspective. Important questions to ask to determine the best fit for your child and clinical practice will be examined.  Further, it will highlight how parents and clinicians partner effectively when PROMPT is implemented to meet the individual needs of children with CAS.

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Series 400

Session 401: Your Child’s Journey with CAS: SLP and Parent Perspective

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Breanna Waldrup, MS, CCC-SLP, Megan Tarchichi, MD

Overwhelming. Confusing. Surprising. Inspiring. Frustrating. A roller coaster. Relationship building.

Scary. Life changing. These are all words that can be and have been used to describe a child’s journey with CAS. Each child and family’s journey is unique, with different starting points, finish lines, bumps and detours along the way. However, there are commonalities and frequently used paths (as well as ditches). The presenters hope to create a road map by providing perspectives and information from the viewpoint of a speech-language pathologist who has walked beside dozens of children with CAS and their families on their journey, and a parent who is currently accompanying two of her children with CAS on two separate paths. The road map will include information about steps along the way, common “speed bumps”(challenges) at various stages, possible detours, and a review of the diverse therapy approaches used.

 

Session 402: SLP Moms – The Challenge of Wearing Both Hats!

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Laura Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, Kimberly Peterman, MA, CCC-SLP, Erika Talbot, MA, CCC-SLP

As parents to children with apraxia, have you ever felt frustrated, shut out, discounted, or patronized? As SLPs, have parents seemed too overbearing, demanding, or seem to have unrealistic expectations?  For optimal outcomes, building rapport with the family is just as important as building rapport with the child. The three presenters are all mothers to children with apraxia as well as SLPs who have had to navigate both sides of this delicate, and many times rocky, parent/SLP relationship. They know firsthand the anxiety, guilt and shame parents feel when their child has a speech disorder. They also know that many SLPs make well-intentioned statements or comments that can have an unknowing and damaging effect on the relationship.  The first half of the seminar will outline their experiences as SLP moms to children with apraxia.  The second half of the seminar will provide practical suggestions on how caregivers and therapists can keep the lines of communication open and brainstorm different ways all parties can be included in the therapy process.

 

Session 403: Current Trends in the Assessment of CAS

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Sue Caspari, MA, CCC-SLP

This hands-on workshop will provide clinicians with a solid foundation of knowledge in the current best-practice for the assessment of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), including the NEW Dynamic Evaluation of Motor Speech Skill (DEMSS) (Strand, et al, 2013; Strand & McCauley, 2019). This new criterion-referenced assessment was designed specifically to help differentially diagnose CAS in young children with severely impaired speech production skills. This dynamic assessment can help clinicians confirm or rule out a diagnosis of CAS, estimate the severity of the disorder and prognosis, inform treatment goals, and make decisions about effective methods of cueing for treatment.  Other evidence-based assessment procedures that will be covered include the Syllable Repetition Task (SRT) (Shriberg, et al, 2012), the Maximum Performance Tasks (MPT) (Rvachew, et al, 2005; Thoonen, et al, 1999; Thoonen, et al, 1996), and the Pause Marker (PM) method (Shriberg, et al, 2017a & b).  Video examples will be shown throughout the session to demonstrate the assessment procedures.  Hands-on group activities will be utilized to give participants practice in making clinical decisions about when to use each of the assessment methods discussed.

 

Session 404: Matchmaker-Matchmaker: Matching Evidence-Based Programs to the Child’s Needs

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Margaret (Dee) Fish, MS, CCC-SLP

Participants attending this session will be provided with an overview of seven evidence-based treatment programs for CAS.  The research evidence to date supporting each program will be discussed along with the stages of development and specific speech challenges to which each program is best suited.  Case studies will be used to discuss which of the various programs might be the best match for children with various communication profiles.  The seven programs to be discussed during this session include: Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cueing (DTTC); Integrated Phonological Awareness Intervention; Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol (K-SLP); Nuffield Centre Dyspraxia Programme 3rd Edition (NDP3); Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT); Rapid Syllable Transitions Treatment (ReST); and Ultrasound Biofeedback.

 

Session 405: Principles of Motor Learning in Treatment: Updates, New Findings, and Future Directions

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Edwin Maas, PhD

In the last 20 years, researchers and clinicians have turned to the motor learning literature to find ways to maximize treatment outcomes.. In particular, there has been growing interest in so-called principles of motor learning (e.g., Maas et al., 2008). This presentation provides an overview of principles of motor learning and an update on the current state of evidence for or against these principles as applied to treatment for CAS. We will critically review all published studies that have examined principles of motor learning in CAS treatment, and present findings from a study (funded by Apraxia-Kids) that examines the role of principles of practice amount and practice distribution (intensity). Given the relative sparsity of direct empirical evidence, we will also discuss explanations of why or how these practice and feedback conditions are thought to operate, so that clinicians can make inferences regarding the likely benefit of a given condition for a given client. Finally, we will discuss ways in which these conditions (if effective) could be incorporated into clinical practice.

 

Session 406: Build Your “Dream Team” – Collaboration Challenges

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Sarah Carmody, MS, CCC-SLP, Tovah Feehan, MS, CCC-SLP, CEIM, Hallie Mintz, MS, CCC-SLP

Arriving at a diagnosis, navigating treatment options and settings; moving through ages and stages of development; transitioning from home, to daycare, to school, to the community and beyond – children with CAS (and their families) encounter numerous professionals. Finding the perfect recipe for collaboration amongst your team can be a challenge, but it’s clear that coordinated approaches to goal planning, cueing, therapy, social and academic support can have a significant impact on progress!  We are 3 SLPs who are thrilled to be part of the “village” for our families impacted by CAS. Three years ago, we embarked on an adventure as the founding members of a pediatric hospital satellite therapy team. In this talk, we’ll explain how “outside the box” thinking has helped us plan meaningful, evidence-driven therapy for children with CAS at various ages and levels. We’ll share what we’ve learned from tackling some of the typical roadblocks of the medical setting (insurance, waitlists, limited lengths of care), but also, more importantly, how we’ve built and leveraged collaborative connections in our community (families, teachers, school-based therapy teams, pediatric offices, specialty doctors, daycare centers) – to fuel progress and reduce barriers for children and families.

 

Session 407: Vowel Therapy Strategies from Two Experienced SLPs

Time: 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Julie Hoffman, MA, CCC-SLP, Amy Clark, MS, CCC-SLP

Children with CAS can exhibit significant challenges producing vowels, which negatively impacts intelligibility. Some children with CAS only produce a couple of the 14 English vowels, while others struggle sequencing consonant sounds to vowel sounds to create syllables, and others lose vowel accuracy across syllables. Often one of the challenges for children with residual speech errors is directly related to continued persistent vowel errors. This presentation will focus on detailed therapy ideas for facilitating and increasing vowel accuracy for children with CAS.  The session will be co-presented to allow for discussion of various approaches to vowel modification, including PROMPT, for facilitating optimal functional communication outcomes.

Series 500

Session 501: Siblings of Children with CAS

Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Sarah Freiburger, Dave Hammer, MA, CCC-SLP

One fear that many parents have as they face the challenges of raising a child with CAS, is what the impact will be on their other children. Does all of the extra attention that the child with CAS gets as they are doing intensive speech therapy make their siblings feel left out? How can they get the whole family involved to make everyone a part of the process? How do they make time for everyone’s needs? How do they explain what CAS is to the siblings and is it necessary to do this? Will the siblings resent them for the extra attention and time that they are getting? We will address these questions and more as the sibling of a child with severe CAS shares her experiences, and an SLP shares strategies that families can use to address these concerns.

 

Session 502: One Approach to School Therapy Challenges

Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Lisa Kohel, B.Ed., MSLP, R.SLP, SLP (C)

In 2016, the question was asked to school administrators, How can we provide services to children with severe speech delays and suspected speech­motor learning disabilities (childhood apraxia of speech or CAS) in pre­kindergarten, kindergarten, and in the elementary grades that, follows current best practice guidelines and recommendations and prepares the students to achieve a level of spoken language proficiency that enables full participation in their academic and social learning contexts?

Planning stages occurred in 2016. Implementation occurred in 2017.  Since 2017, this school division offers intensive, individual programming for students with severe speech delays and suspected speech­motor learning disabilities.  To date, the programs offered are Let’s Start Talking (LST)™ (pre­Kindergarten and Kindergarten) and Let’s Talk Clearly (LTC)™ (Kindergarten and school-aged), which are programs developed by Dr. Megan Hodge at the University of Alberta.  These programs provide a framework within an intervention model for children with severe speech learning problems.

 

Session 503: Welcoming Home Practice into Your Life

Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Angela Muis, BA, SLP-A

Home practice is very rewarding but it can also be challenging.  For parents, learning the skills needed to support speech attempts can be intimidating.  Balancing the fine line between parent and amateur therapist can feel perilous, and finding time to practice speech in an already busy life can sometimes feel impossible.  How can a parent make this work? This session will explore the benefits of home practice, unpack the obstacles and emotions participants may face, and equip participants with strategies for successfully bringing speech practice into family life.  We will dive deeply into effective SLP collaboration, time management, leveraging unique strengths, accessing support, and creative home practice activities that are fun and rewarding for both parent and child.

 

Session 504: Diagnosing and Treating Children with CAS and Hearing Loss

Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Brittany Furnari, MS, CCC-SLP

This presentation will outline how the diagnosis and treatment of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) differs for children in the presence of a co-occurring, aided hearing loss. In the first portion of the presentation, the similarities and differences in the global symptoms of both conditions will be discussed. The audience will explore the diagnostic criterion of childhood apraxia of speech through the lens of a co-occurring hearing loss. The second portion of the presentation will address intervention. The audience will be introduced to a listening in spoken language (LSL) approach to treating hearing loss and a multimodal, motor-based approach (incorporating the principles of motor learning) to treating childhood apraxia of speech. The final portion of this presentation will include two brief case study videos.

 

Session 505: Interpreting the Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice: A Tutorial on Single-Case Experimental Design Treatment Research

Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Edwin Maas, PhD

This presentation offers a tutorial on the power and pitfalls of treatment research, with a particular emphasis on single-case experimental designs (also known as single-subject designs or

N-of-1 trials). The main reason for this emphasis is that the majority of treatment research in CAS uses single-subject designs (Maas et al., 2014; Murray et al., 2014). The purpose of this tutorial is to provide parents and clinicians with knowledge that will facilitate their ability to critically evaluate published treatment studies, and thereby enhance clinical decision-making and advocacy. Important concepts will be illustrated using examples from the existing literature and from recent work in our lab. The focus of the presentation will not be on any specific treatment approach but rather on the logic, strengths, and weaknesses of the experimental designs, and their implications for the quality of the evidence. The versatility of single-subject designs will be discussed in relation to the two main treatment questions, namely (1) Does Treatment X work? And (2) Does Treatment X work better than, Treatment Y?  As an added bonus, in the course of the workshop, the state of evidence for treatment efficacy in CAS treatment will be highlighted.

 

Session 506: How to Raise Happy, Healthy Eaters

Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Leah Melamed, MS, CCC-SLP

Mealtime can be challenging with children of all ages, and at times with children with childhood apraxia of speech. Sensory issues, as well as power struggles can result in frustration and anxiety for both the child and the entire family. This presentation will address the journey that parents and children go through and outline strategies to expand a child’s food preferences, reduce tension in the home around meal times, and to create a family meal time that is a pleasant social experience for the entire family.

 

Session 507: ReST Advanced – A Q&A With the Expert

Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Tricia McCabe, BAppSc(Sp) PhD CPSP

This 1-hour session will provide a unique opportunity for therapists using the Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) program, or those considering this approach, to pose questions to a ReST expert in an informal manner.

Series 600

Session 601: A Case Study: A Journey from Hypothesis to Goal Writing

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Laura Moorer, MA, CCC-SLP

Let’s take a journey together through a case study starting with the parent’s concern of “I think my child might have apraxia!”  After looking at case history information and a video clip of spontaneous language, participants will use small group discussions to develop a hypothesis and an assessment plan. Possible assessments and rationale will be discussed.  Video clips of the child’s assessment will be shown and results of the completed assessments will be revealed, leading to a discussion on diagnosis. Critical parts of a diagnostic statement will be discussed by the presenter and then participants will work in groups to write a diagnostic statement for the case study.  After the diagnostic statements are shared with the whole group, appropriate directions for therapy will be discussed.  The SMART framework for writing goals will be reviewed and participants will get in small groups to develop long- and short-term goals in areas of speech sound production and prosody.  The session will end with sharing of long- and short-term goals with the entire group.

 

Session 602: Genes, Brains, and Apraxia: Practical Applications for Parents and SLPs

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Beate Peter, PhD, CCC-SLP, Caitlin Vose, PhD, CCC-SLP

The pathway from gene to brain to speech is not well understood. Even less clear is what SLPs and parents can do if they suspect a genetic cause. They might wonder, whom can I contact to get advice and answers? Will genetic testing be helpful? How might a genetic diagnosis change the treatment approach?  Will a genetic diagnosis have consequences for future children in the family? In the first part of the seminar, we will outline some basic principles of genetics and how changes in genes can cause certain changes in the brain and in the speech production of a child with CAS. We illustrate these principles with actual cases from our research laboratory. In the second part of the seminar, we will address how to recognize red flags for a genetic etiology and how to make the right referrals. During this part of the seminar, we will touch on genetic testing, what it can and cannot do, and the pros and cons of getting genetic testing for a child. We illustrate this part of the seminar with some clinical scenarios and hands-on practice.

 

Session 603: Using Speech Motor Chaining to Treat School-Aged Children

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Jonathan Preston, PhD, CCC-SLP, Megan Leece, MA, CCC-SLP

Speech Motor Chaining is an operationalized treatment for school-aged children with CAS. This structured form of practice is designed to help transition from a focus on acquisition of targets (i.e., successful performance within a session) towards a focus on speech motor learning.  The approach has been used to guide the treatment structure for 6 published studies, and we have used the practice structure both with and without visual feedback.  A tutorial about the approach has recently been published (Preston, Leece & Storto, in press). Speech Motor Chaining involves stimuli that are chained around a core movement pattern (typically a CV or VC syllable). For example, onset /s/ may be forward chained in targets such as /si/, seed, seedling, plant a seedling, or backward chained as in /si/, seat, receipt, gift receipt.  In this session, attendees will be given an opportunity to both see the treatment and to practice using it.

 

Session 604: Evaluation and Management of 2-Year-Olds with Suspected CAS

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents  ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Margaret (Dee) Fish, MS, CCC-SLP, Megan Overby, PhD, CCC-SLP

The differential diagnosis of CAS from other types of speech sound disorders is challenging in very young children who often have minimal speech output. Very young children typically cannot participate in standardized testing and often do not have sufficient speech output to assist in making a diagnosis. So although parents and clinicians may suspect CAS in a minimally verbal 2 year old child, the diagnosis often remains uncertain until the child is older. Clinical guidelines for early diagnosis can be helpful to the clinician who suspects CAS in a young child, providing the clinician with information to determine what missing skills put the child at-risk for CAS.  In this presentation, we will discuss some of the emerging possible guidelines for evaluating 2-year-olds with suspected CAS. If an evaluation reveals that the child may have CAS, treatment should integrate the motor, social, cognitive, and linguistic supports that can facilitate speech sound development. Treatment should consider, for example, whether the child is capable of imitation, can produce a basic consonant-vowel syllable shape, and understands reciprocity. We will discuss these supports and how they provide a foundation for speech sound development. Specific evidence-based strategies to support speech development in non-verbal and minimally verbal children will be offered.

 

Session 605: PROMPT Research: A Meta-Analysis of Effects, Efficacy and Efficiency

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Advanced Level

Presenters: Aravind Namasivayam, PhD

The empirical studies of Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT) treatment first appeared in the literature around mid-1980s. Over the past 30 years, the PROMPT intervention has evolved into a comprehensive and systematic treatment approach to address communication disorders across the life span, including childhood apraxia of speech. To successfully implement research-to-clinical practice using PROMPT treatment, it is crucial to understand (a) why the intervention works; (b) who should receive this intervention, (c) what is the quality of evidence supporting the approach; and (d) how it fits into the broader context of clinical-outcome testing. The purpose of the presentation are (a) to summarize behavioral outcomes from PROMPT intervention studies; (b) to discuss potential means by which PROMPT intervention achieves its intended therapeutic effect or action; (c) to report preliminary meta-analysis of experimental data from single subject and group design studies, including the recently completed PROMPT randomized controlled trial (RCT); and (d) to evaluate the quality of PROMPT intervention studies using a hierarchy of evidence quality framework.

 

Session 606: Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP

It is the middle of the night and something jars you awake. Your brain starts working and you begin to go through a list of everything you need to accomplish in the next few days. You begin to prioritize your time, imagine virtually walking through the actions needed to complete lesson plans, reports, attend family appointments and schedule meetings, etc. Your ability to do this is rooted in executive functioning (EF). Those capacities are at the core of every action we undertake. It is the fuel that drives goal-directed behavior. This session is designed to help participants better understand the development of EF and what happens when there are challenges. Understanding its application to CAS is crucial to understanding its impact on therapeutic outcomes. We will start with a very brief overview of development and then connect EF to academic and social-emotional functioning. The session will illustrate key points and assessment tasks and finally demonstrate ways in which all of us (diagnosticians, parents, paraprofessionals, treatment clinicians, etc.) can promote the growth of the necessary skills for solid executive functioning.

 

Session 607:  Apraxia and Literacy: Identification and Causes

Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Level:   Experienced Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Intermediate Level

Presenters: Paul Beljan, PsyD, ABPdN, ABN, Lynn Carahaly, MA, CCC-SLP

Children with speech sound disorders such as childhood apraxia of speech can be at a higher risk for reading and spelling impairments. The quality of phonological processing and the presence of poor speech articulation are predicative of later reading deficits, particularly dyslexia. This lecture will focus on why dyslexia is often comorbid with apraxia. We will discuss how to assess, identify, and understand the cognitive underpinnings related to mixed disorders (i.e. attention deficit disorder/executive function deficit), as well as treatment strategies to facilitate early intervention. The importance of a dual-treatment model will also be discussed in addition to elevating other underlying cognitive proficiencies to become a fluent reader.

 

Session 701: Youth and Young Adults – A Time for Sharing

Time: 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Level:   Beginning Learning Level for Parents   ASHA Introductory Level

Presenters: Jayden LaVecchia, Ashlyn Smith, Mikey Akers, Alyson Taylor, and Natalie Yoder

Over the years, Apraxia Kids has received many comments in post-conference surveys regarding the amazing experience of hearing teens and young adults talk about their journeys.  2019 is no exception with one bonus feature added: we will have two brave young children with CAS tell their stories first.  This will be followed by a young adult panel where a Q&A time will be facilitated by a parent of a child who has been on the CAS journey for years.  This session will serve as our closing session and everyone is welcome!

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