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Learn about other diagnoses and conditions that can co-occur with childhood apraxia of speech; autism; down syndrome; CAPD

  • Why is Dysarthria, as a Diagnosis, Often Missed in Children and What Distinguishes it from Apraxia?

    By
    Michael Crary, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Dysarthria is by traditional definition a motor speech disorder that results from direct motor impairment to the muscles of speech production. This impairment may be from damage to the central portions of the nervous system contributing to a spastic paresis, from the peripheral portions of the nervous system contributing to flaccid paresis, or to the […]

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  • What About Children Who Don’t Quite Meet the “Threshold” for a Diagnosis of CAS?

    By
    Rebecca McCauley, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    An unknown number of children may fail to be diagnosed with CAS because of the circumstances surrounding their evaluation or because they have problems that are closely related to CAS, but don’t meet a threshold for diagnosis. This group may, for example, include children who are too young to participate fully in testing, who have […]

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  • Shaping Verbal Language for Children on the Spectrum of Autism Who Also Exhibit Apraxia of Speech

    By
    Nancy Kaufman, M.A., CCC/SLP and Tamara S. Kasper, MS/CCC-SLP, BCBA

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders are vocal, yet non-verbal. They may produce consonants, vowels and syllables, but do not use words to communicate. Though it is difficult to judge whether or not these children exhibit apraxia of speech, a specialized approach of shaping successive word approximations, combined with sign language, may help non-verbal children […]

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  • Neuropsychology in Long-term Educational Planning for Children With Apraxia of Speech

    By
    Gerry Taylor, Ph.D.

    Clinical neuropsychology is the application of knowledge of brain-behavior relationships for assessment and treatment of a wide range of disorders. In children these disorders include outright neurological disease or injury, as well as conditions of presumed constitutional origin, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and speech and language impairment. Childhood apraxia of […]

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  • Lessons from Abigail: Educating a Seasoned Speech-Language Pathologist Named “Mom”

    (Reprinted with permission from Disability Solutions Newsletter.)

    By
    Carrie Olson, M.S., CCC-SLP

    Soe down, Mommy. Big, big tuck right ner.” These beautiful words came from the back seat as I passed a double tandem semi on I-75. My 4-year-old daughter, Abigail, was straining to see the “big, big tuck” from her car seat. Abigail is a delightful child. She is bright, engaging, sensitive, creative and energetic. She […]

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  • Children with Apraxia of Speech and Feeding Difficulties

    By
    Suzanne Evans Morris, Ph.D.

    The bottom line is that we can’t “get children to eat.” To paraphrase a popular phrase “Eating is an inside job.” As parents and therapists we simple create the environment in which the child is comfortable with food and is able to develop the skills that support eating more skillfully. When we shift our attention […]

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  • Children with Apraxia and the Use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    By
    Gary Cumley, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Children with severe phonological disorders have a higher probability of failed communication interactions because of a reduced level of intelligibility. A severe phonological disorder results in children having difficulty initiating and participating successfully in communication interactions. As a coping mechanism, these children may avoid talking situations, may simplify their vocal responses, and may rely more […]

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  • Children with Apraxia and Periods of Dysfluency

    By
    David Hammer, M.A., CCC-SLP

    As children with apraxia are in therapy for a period of time, they may experience phases of system “overload,” when the demands for speech motor complexity appear greater that the capacity to handle them. It can be quite frustrating to the parent and therapist alike to all of the sudden be faced with yet another […]

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  • The Role of the Developmental Pediatrician and Children with CAS

    By
    Heidi Feldman, MD, Ph.D.

    Developmental-behavioral pediatrics is a subspecialty of pediatrics. As such, it functions with the orientation, beliefs, and practices of Western allopathic medicine. In this tradition, the practitioner gathers information about signs and symptoms and tries to explain them through a single over-riding diagnosis. In the process, the practitioner considers many diagnoses that might account for signs […]

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  • The Purpose of Genetic Testing and Its Relevance to Children with Apraxia

    By
    Heidi Feldman, M.D., Ph.D.

    The purpose of genetic testing is to provide a genetic diagnosis and to provide as much information as possible to patients and families. First, the information may explain why a child, in this case, has a disorder. Understanding the cause of a disorder is helpful to many families. Second, if the testing reveals a known […]

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