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Find articles about education, learning and school-related needs of children with CAS. What to include in school programs...

  • Truth or Misleading? “Children with Apraxia of Speech Make Very Slow Progress”

    By
    CASANA

    The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (CASANA), along with members of its Professional Advisory Board, has engaged in discussion about the misleading impression that children with apraxia of speech make very slow progress in speech therapy. Some children are diagnosed with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) by speech-language pathologists who are using […]

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  • The Relationship of Practice and Repetition to Motor Learning for Speech in Children with Apraxia

    By
    Edythe Strand, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BC-NCD

    Clinicians and parents commonly observe that practice and repetition facilitate progress in therapy for childhood apraxia of speech. Why is this aspect of treatment more important in children who have apraxia, than for children who’s primary deficit is in language or phonology? The answer lies in the fact that children with apraxia of speech primarily […]

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  • Neuropsychology in Long-term Educational Planning for Children With Apraxia of Speech

    By
    Gerry Taylor, Ph.D.

    Clinical neuropsychology is the application of knowledge of brain-behavior relationships for assessment and treatment of a wide range of disorders. In children these disorders include outright neurological disease or injury, as well as conditions of presumed constitutional origin, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and speech and language impairment. Childhood apraxia of […]

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  • Key Factors in Appropriate Therapy Approach for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    By
    Shelley Velleman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Key factors to consider in therapy approaches for childhood apraxia of speech: It’s a dynamic disorder, and it’s far more a disorder of combining elements than of producing the elements themselves. In other words, the main problem is in putting elements together “on line”. The person may be able to make a certain consonant sound […]

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  • Considerations and Recommendations for an Appropriate School-based Speech Therapy Program

    By
    Donald A. Robin, Ph.D., BC-NCD

    The components of any speech-language treatment program will vary depending on the individual child. But there are a number of general guidelines that should help parents know if their child is getting appropriate services. Before going into the general guidelines it is important that the diagnosis is checked for accuracy. Many clinicians in the schools […]

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  • Language Processing and Comprehension Issues and Children with CAS

    By
    Chris Dollaghan, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Language processing refers to the mental operations by which we perceive, recognize, understand and remember sounds, words, and sentences. Because it happens “inside the head,” language processing can’t be seen directly, instead, we have to test for processing problems. It’s natural to focus on the speech production difficulties of children with CAS, but there are […]

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  • Intervention for Bilingual Children with CAS

    By
    Kathryn Kohnert, Ph.D., CCC, and Ruth Stoeckel, M.A., CCC-SLP

    From a practical standpoint, bilinguals can be defined as individuals who use more than one language in their daily communicative interactions (Grosjean, 1982). In the global village, more than half of all children learn at least two languages. In many cases, these children are from families in which one language is used at home, and […]

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  • Giving the News

    How to Talk to Parents About the Apraxia Diagnosis

    By
    Sharon Gretz, M.Ed.

    The hardest requirement for many healthcare professionals that provide services to children is to deliver news to parents and caregivers that is perceived as “bad news.” In this sense, speech-language pathology is no different than other health related professions. Caring individuals enter into helping professions and thus are usually sensitive to the feelings of the […]

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