Skip to main content

Basic information about Childhood Apraxia of Speech, definitions, characteristics, speech & language development basics.

  • Common Acronyms and Abbreviations

    Abbreviations and acronyms can be confusing to parents and families. Here is an acronym “dictionary” for parents of children with apraxia.

    Edited by Donna Marucci If you don’t find what you’re looking for on this page, try South Dakota University’s Dictionary For Parents of Children with Disabilities AAC Augmentative and Alternative Communication ABA Applied Behavior Analysis ACT Adapted Cueing Technique ADA Americans with Disabilities Act (U.S.) ADD Attention Deficit Disorder ADHD Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder AIT […]

    Read More
  • Characteristics of Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    While there are many reasons that some children fail to develop age-appropriate speech and/or language skills, the following are frequently mentioned characteristics of children with apraxia of speech (not every child will have all characteristics.) This list was compiled from professional literature which is referenced at the end. Professionals and researchers do not all agree […]

    Read More
  • Can A Child Have Oral Apraxia Without Also Having Speech Apraxia/Dyspraxia?

    By
    Shelley Velleman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    At first blush, this might seem like a logical impossibility. If you can’t move your oral structures for non-speech, how could you do so for speech? The key here is to differentiate between automatic and volitional (deliberate) oral activities. We often see children who can do all of the appropriate oral movements for eating with […]

    Read More
  • Brief Ideas for Speech Therapy for Children with Apraxia of Speech

    By
    David Hammer, M.A., CCC-SLP

    Just as communication therapy for children with apraxia of speech presents unique challenges, it certainly is a challenge to present my views on treatment in a few paragraphs. There are many complexities involved when we discuss therapy strategies due to the wide range of children whom we service. These include, but certainly are not limited […]

    Read More
  • Because It’s Your Child! Evaluating Information on the Internet

    By
    Sharon Gretz, M.Ed.

    When you discover that your child has apraxia or any other significant special need, often the quest begins to not only learn about the problem but also to find a way to improve or cure the problem. We hope for a simple solution. Maybe it is out there somewhere. The thought that we can help […]

    Read More
  • Ask the Therapist: Frequently Asked Questions

    By
    Nancy Lucker-Lazerson, M.A., CCC-SLP

    (Updated by the author November 2003) What resources are available on Childhood CAS of Speech (CAS)? At what age is it appropriate to diagnose CAS? What factors do you use in basing recommendations for intensity of direct speech therapy services for children with CAS? How much overlap is there between CAS and aphasia? Is CAS […]

    Read More
  • Apraxia? Dyspraxia? Articulation? Phonology? What Does It All Mean?

    By
    Nancy Lucker-Lazerson, M.A., CCC-SLP

    (Updated by the author October 2003) Your two-year-old says no words, makes some sounds, yet he understands everything you say. Your five-year-old speaks in what appear to be sentences, but all you hear are vowel sounds. Your seven-year-old lisps, and says “wabbit” instead of “rabbit”. And your three-year-old talks non-stop, but no one can understand […]

    Read More
  • A Few Quick Explanations and Definitions Related to Apraxia

    Childhood Apraxia of Speech or Developmental Verbal Apraxia? Oral Apraxia and/or Verbal (Speech) Apraxia? Volitional? What does it Mean? “Pure” Apraxia of Speech Childhood Apraxia of Speech or Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia? These two terms are generally synonymous. Developmental verbal dyspraxia is often shortened to “DVD” and childhood apraxia of speech to “CAS”. The “a” in […]

    Read More
  • A Case Study of Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    The following is a case study which is based on several actual children I have seen over the years with the diagnosis of dyspraxia or apraxia. The name is fictitious.

    By
    Patti Hamaguchi, M.A., CCC-SLP

    Jamie, a six year-old boy, moved into town and entered first grade. He was very unintelligible (hard to understand), but seemed to have a lot to say. His teacher said he did well on many of the math papers, but struggled with letters and sounds. Jamie had been receiving speech therapy for the past year […]

    Read More
  • A Brief Overview of Language and Approaches to its Assessment

    One Professional's Perspective

    By
    Thomas Powell, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Most of us take our ability to communicate for granted. We think of something to say, open our mouths, and the words come out. Although it may appear to be a simple thing, the communication process is actually very complicated. The complexity of human communication becomes especially apparent when we consider the diversity that exists […]

    Read More