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Basic information about Childhood Apraxia of Speech, definitions, characteristics, speech & language development basics.

  • How to Find a Speech-Language Pathologist

    By
    Maria Novak, M.A., reg. CALSPRO, CCC-SLP

    Finding the best professional for your child can be a trying process. When looking for a speech-language pathologist (SLP), it’s really important to get just the right “fit”, as that professional will be working intensely with your child for a significant length of time. Here are some questions to help you choose a therapist. 1. […]

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  • How Parents Can Help Their Child with Apraxia at Home

    By
    Tim Burns

    One of the first questions that parents of a child newly diagnosed with apraxia ask, is, what can I do at home? The fact that you are asking that question and reading this article are great signs that your child will make big strides toward recovery. In my opinion, the single biggest factor in the […]

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  • Hearing Your Silence

    For All Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    By
    Donald Robin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    We don’t understand when we hear your silence We cant see behind your frustrated eyes when you plead for our attention We are unable to feel your awkwardness when you try to speak and the wrong sounds emerge We cannot be inside you to will your tongue to move when it struggles to find the […]

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  • Giving the News

    How to Talk to Parents About the Apraxia Diagnosis

    By
    Sharon Gretz, M.Ed.

    The hardest requirement for many healthcare professionals that provide services to children is to deliver news to parents and caregivers that is perceived as “bad news.” In this sense, speech-language pathology is no different than other health related professions. Caring individuals enter into helping professions and thus are usually sensitive to the feelings of the […]

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  • Does Training Non-speech Oral Movements Facilitate Speech-sound Production in Children with Motor Speech Disorders?

    By
    Thomas Campbell, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BC-NCD

    There are precious few data available to support the notion that training non-speech oral movements facilitates the speech-sound production abilities of children with motor speech disorders. However, there are many advocates on both sides of this issue. Although there has been a proliferation of motor training programs for sale that are replete with specialized equipment […]

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  • Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia: Information for Parents

    Dyspraxia means difficulty with learned patterns of movement in the absence of damage to the muscles or the nerves. When different people talk about dyspraxia, you'd think they would all be talking about the same thing. However, that does not always seem to be the case. As a term, it is used by a range of professionals but to refer to rather different conditions.

    By
    the AFASIC Organization

    What do you mean he has dyspraxia? The Predominant Presentation Case Studies Where To Begin The Future? A Condition that “Unfolds” The Nuffield Hearing and Speech Centre More Help and Information Q.What do you mean he has dyspraxia? A. Dyspraxia means difficulty with learned patterns of movement in the absence of damage to the muscles […]

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  • Developmental Apraxia of Speech: Information for Parents

    By
    Kathy Jakielski, Ph.D., CCC-SLP; Thomas P. Marquardt, Ph.D., CCC-SLP; and Barbara L. Davis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Developmental apraxia of speech (DAS) is a poorly understood speech disorder in children. This paper describes important aspects of the disorder based on historical and current research findings combined with our own clinical observations. It is intended for parents and addresses the following questions: What is DAS? What are the characteristics of DAS? How is […]

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  • Definitions of Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Learn how various professionals and researchers have defined apraxia of speech in children.

    “Apraxia is difficulty forming sounds into words. The term developmental apraxia is used when children have this problem.” Nancy Williams, MA, “Developmental Apraxia,” Communication Skill Builders, 1988. “Although the exact speech breakdown and its severity varies from child to child, children with verbal apraxia fail to establish the full repertoire of English phonemes, that is, […]

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