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Learn about other diagnoses and conditions that can co-occur with childhood apraxia of speech; autism; down syndrome; CAPD

  • Children with Apraxia of Speech and Feeding Difficulties

    By
    Suzanne Evans Morris, Ph.D.

    The bottom line is that we can’t “get children to eat.” To paraphrase a popular phrase “Eating is an inside job.” As parents and therapists we simple create the environment in which the child is comfortable with food and is able to develop the skills that support eating more skillfully. When we shift our attention […]

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  • Children with Apraxia and the Use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    By
    Gary Cumley, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Children with severe phonological disorders have a higher probability of failed communication interactions because of a reduced level of intelligibility. A severe phonological disorder results in children having difficulty initiating and participating successfully in communication interactions. As a coping mechanism, these children may avoid talking situations, may simplify their vocal responses, and may rely more […]

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  • Children with Apraxia and Periods of Dysfluency

    By
    David Hammer, M.A., CCC-SLP

    As children with apraxia are in therapy for a period of time, they may experience phases of system “overload,” when the demands for speech motor complexity appear greater that the capacity to handle them. It can be quite frustrating to the parent and therapist alike to all of the sudden be faced with yet another […]

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  • The Role of the Developmental Pediatrician and Children with CAS

    By
    Heidi Feldman, MD, Ph.D.

    Developmental-behavioral pediatrics is a subspecialty of pediatrics. As such, it functions with the orientation, beliefs, and practices of Western allopathic medicine. In this tradition, the practitioner gathers information about signs and symptoms and tries to explain them through a single over-riding diagnosis. In the process, the practitioner considers many diagnoses that might account for signs […]

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  • The Purpose of Genetic Testing and Its Relevance to Children with Apraxia

    By
    Heidi Feldman, M.D., Ph.D.

    The purpose of genetic testing is to provide a genetic diagnosis and to provide as much information as possible to patients and families. First, the information may explain why a child, in this case, has a disorder. Understanding the cause of a disorder is helpful to many families. Second, if the testing reveals a known […]

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  • Language: A Code for Communicating

    By
    Paul P. Wang and Marleen Ann Baron

    Excerpted from Children with Disabilities, (pp. 275-292), Fourth Edition, edited by Mark L. Batshaw, M.D. Baltimore: Brookes Publishing, http://www.brookespublishing.com. Copyright 1997 by Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher. Ordering Information: ISBN 1-55766-293-2 Hardcover […]

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  • Language Processing and Comprehension Issues and Children with CAS

    By
    Chris Dollaghan, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Language processing refers to the mental operations by which we perceive, recognize, understand and remember sounds, words, and sentences. Because it happens “inside the head,” language processing can’t be seen directly, instead, we have to test for processing problems. It’s natural to focus on the speech production difficulties of children with CAS, but there are […]

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  • Apraxia? Dyspraxia? Articulation? Phonology? What Does It All Mean?

    By
    Nancy Lucker-Lazerson, M.A., CCC-SLP

    (Updated by the author October 2003) Your two-year-old says no words, makes some sounds, yet he understands everything you say. Your five-year-old speaks in what appear to be sentences, but all you hear are vowel sounds. Your seven-year-old lisps, and says “wabbit” instead of “rabbit”. And your three-year-old talks non-stop, but no one can understand […]

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